Your Shipment Has Been Delayed

The tragic effects of Superstorm Sandy will be with many people for a long time.  I’m fortunate that all of my friends on the east coast are ok, although many remain without power. There are so many difficult issues relating to this storm and the cold supply chain is one that may slip under the radar of most people…but not under the radar of supply chain professionals.

Andrea Charles of Pharma-IQ (part of IQPC) recently wrote an article that asked about supply chains being ready for natural disasters.  She raises the impact of tsunamis, hurricanes and earthquakes (not to mention blizzards, power outages, or other issues) on the pharmaceutical cold chain. She also speaks to the need to ensure that important medications are available to those affected by a disaster. I won’t debate here about whether climate change is real or not because, whether it is or isn’t, if you’re shipping high value, temperature-sensitive pharmaceutical or food items and your shipment is delayed due to an unpredictable storm or disaster, you’re at risk.

Now What Do You Do?

Andrea quotes Dave Alberts, Director at Crimson & Co. who says: Unfortunately, there is no way in which to fully prepare for such natural disasters as they are unexpected. However, the frequency at which these occur validate that contingency plans must be put in place wherever possible and organizations must attempt to protect product supply through efficient, planned out strategies and best practices. Research into the affects is a good start and companies participating in this are clearly at the forefront of successful and adaptive supply chains.”

Alberts talks about the need for adaptive supply chains.  I agree.  But what makes a supply chain adaptable is intelligence – knowing the condition of your product on-demand as it travels from the manufacturer to its destination.  If your product is stuck at an airport due to cancelled or delayed flights or if a ship can’t dock or a truck can’t get through, you need to know if its temperature is still in range so that you can rechill or reroute as necessary.  You want to be able to do this autonomously and without searching out and opening individual packages.  With so much unpredictability, you can’t account for every conceivable variable but you can build in the ability to proactively manage your supply chain so you can respond in a timely manner when a disaster strikes and help minimize losses.  Wireless temperature monitors that provide actionable data on-demand can help.

Kevin Payne

Senior Director of Marketing

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s